Afghanistan Rights Monitor: Baseline Assessment

May 1, 2016
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Human and fundamental rights have been prominent features of international support to Afghanistan since 2001. The legal framework supporting fundamental rights in Afghanistan is extensive and includes the 2004 Afghan Constitution and numerous associated laws. The Constitution’s preamble references commitment to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) while Chapter Two delineates the “fundamental rights and duties of citizen” in 38 articles including equality, freedom from discrimination, due process and just detention and search provisions, freedom of expression, freedom of association, freedom to peacefully demonstrate, freedom of movement, the right to education, the right to work, and the right to healthcare, among other provisions.

Afghanistan Rights Monitor (ARM) was designed to support informed policy and action on fundamental rights protection and promotion through research, constructive advocacy, and increased capacity of public institutions. ARM is premised on the idea that institutionalization of fundamental rights in Afghanistan’s system of governance must filter into the everyday practices of both government and civil society actors. This baseline report and subsequent four-monthly monitoring reports cover 10 provinces (29 districts in total), selected to represent the diversity of conditions throughout the country. “Fundamental Rights” are conceptualized broadly to include Civic (governance, political rights, and freedom of expression), Social (health, food security, education, and family rights), and Economic (right to work and protection at work). The crosscutting themes running through these three pillars are gender relations and corruption.

Keywords: Human Security, Human Rights, Fundamental Rights, Food Security, Health, Education, Political Representation, Gender, Corruption, Justice, Employment, Children.

Research Fields:   Governance Human Security Reports